A Geek’s Rationale for Closing a Credit Card Account

For the last several years I’ve had 3 credit cards.  One of them was a Chase MasterCard I opened to use with Circuit City’s Rewards program. 5% of each purchase accumulates to use with future purchases.  I thought it was a smart program, so I started buying at Circuit City.

Last week I read somewhere how a number of banks and financial institutions have security design flaws on their websites putting their users at risk.  I hadn’t checked on my Circuit City and Chase accounts for a while (cause I hadn’t bought anything electronic for ages), so I thought I’d pay a visit.

I went to login and saw the url

http://www.chase.com/ccp/index.jsp?blah-blah

You’re kidding me.  I’m going to send my username and password on an open wire when logging into my credit card account?  Unbelievable.  This tells me that Chase doesn’t care about my business, and neither does Circuit City, another reason why the company is heading into the toilet.

Interestingly, here’s a forums thread started on 8/20/2008 on DSLReports.com titled “Chase Bank responds to Website Security Design Flaws.”  Apparently Chase “is again using SSL for its main webpage and login from that page,” but that doesn’t apply to its credit card services.

So I called Chase then and there to close my credit card account.  I mentioned the online security problems with the friendly rep responding, “I can explain how the online system works…” “No, you don’t understand,” I told him.  “No secure login to either my Chase Rewards account or Chase credit card account. That’s just way too incompetent for me to trust my business with you.”

Sometimes you have to listen to your inner-geek.  Down to two credit cards.

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A long time developer, I was an early adopter of Linux in the mid-90's for a few years until I entered corporate environments and worked with Microsoft technologies like ASP, then .NET. In 2008 I released Sueetie, an Online Community Platform built in .NET. In late 2012 I returned to my Linux roots and locked in on Java development. Much of my work is available on GitHub.